Andharban Trek and why you should NOT trek in the Sahyadris

Andhar (dark) and ban (forest) make Andharban a dark forest. Andharban trek is essentially you walking for hours in a dark forest.

Water streams are your constant companion. You will be walking through water, splash-pitter-patter the steady background score. Which will be broken remarkably by the whistling thrush. But since the forest is dense, you won’t see it and believe it’s a rowdy group of guys trying the eve tease!

There are forts around the forest but on the Andharban trek, you will not be able to see any. Because remember how this is the dark forest? It’s covered in mist. So you‘ll just see the mountains rising up and disappearing into the clouds.

The forest itself, when you can see through the thick mist is a monotonous green. This isn’t even a monsoon special. It’s an evergreen forest, so it is just being itself, no exceptional effort on the part of the forest during your Andharban trek.

So really, the Andharban trek is just a long boring way to spend a monsoon day. Here, have a look at this video to see why going on Andharban trek is a really bad idea.

Some more myths about monsoon trekking in the Sahyadris we want to bust:

Monsoon is the best time to trek the Sahyadris

The air is clean and pure. Waterfalls are flowing to full capacity. Trees are their happiest. There is a freshness in the air. There’s so much water around, you won’t even have to carry many water bottles.

You will have to breathe in the fresh air. You will suffer from an overload of oxygen. This will make your lungs hurt. You don’t want that to happen. Stay at home.

Lush green foress and farm on the Tamhini ghat, the headway to the Andharban trek.

Monsoon treks in Sahyadris are great fun

Did you see us having any fun in the video above? We were just walking, crossing the streams and walking some more. What’s fun in that?

Lush green foress and farm on the Tamhini ghat, the headway to the Andharban trek.

Fun is when you can soak in the waterfalls. Now they might bring in the sediments and loose stones when it rains heavy. A sudden heavy rainfall might cause the streams to swell so much so suddenly, you’ll be swept away before you know it. Which is why trekkers, as well as the locals, always caution you against spending time at the waterfall. Even when we wanted to take a short break and have some water, Tukaram – our guide dude would urge us to walk further to the open ground and then take a break.

Clearly, no fun at all. Stay at home.

Monsoon treks in the Sahyadris boost the local economy

You hire a local guide. Get food made by the locals. Binge on the healthy snacks that the locals see at the shacks along the way. Essentially, they get paid for their expertise and uncommon skills.

Monsoon treks in the Sahyadris like the Andharban trek boost the local economy. Monsoon treks in the Sahyadris like the Andharban trek boost the local economy.

But isn’t this all just make believe non-reality? Real boost in the economy is when some urban folks decide to hold some charity events or donation drives. Forget the treks, stay at home.

Monsoon treks in the Sahyadris challenge you and test your limits

For most treks in the Sahyadris, you are climbing up a fort and down. These forts were obviously built to have a difficult access. It’s usually a steep climb up the hill – and a steep descent as well. Monsoon just adds to the challenge by introducing water to the play. You’ve to make your way through gushing streams and slippery rocks.

But the real challenge is how long you can walk straight in an inebriated state, right? Can’t test yourself like that on a trek. Stay at home!

Monsoon treks in the Sahyadris (or any treks) give you a moment of peace and quiet

Waterfalls and green forest on the Andharban trek.

Nothing like nature to help you connect with yourself. Mobile phone network doesn’t reach most of these places. It’s an enforced digital detox. Your focus is entirely on getting the next step right and moving ahead. The only sounds you can hear are the calls of the birds, the swish of the trees and the thunder of water. It’s a beautiful moment to spend with no one with yourself.

Waterfalls and green forest on the Andharban trek.

Doesn’t that sound frightening? Listening to your own thoughts? Spending time with yourself? Where’s the smart phone to distract your mind and the loud music to drown your thoughts? Forget the trek, stay at home!

If however, you get the drift and still insist on stepping out into nature, there’s no better place than the Sahyadris. Sahyadris in the monsoon is pure love.

Andharban was the kind of beauty that makes you cry (and we don’t say that lightly, we have spent time in the Amazon!). We didn’t want the Andharban trek to end. Maybe even get lost in the Andharban forest!

Our guide for the Andharban trek was a super duper, awesome dude. He knew exactly where the risky patches were. His steady feet in the streams gushing with knee deep water, his sense of responsibility towards each one of us, his knowledge of the landscape and the wildlife around Andharban – and his simplicity – was something that will stay with us long after the Andharban trek.

Andharban trek is a beautiful monsoon trek in the Sahyadris.

You can read the details of the Andharban trek if you plan to undertake this adventure for yourself. The base village, Pimpri is accessible via the Tamhini ghat from both, Mumbai and Pune.

Lush green foress and farm on the Tamhini ghat, the headway to the Andharban trek. Lush green foress and farm on the Tamhini ghat, the headway to the Andharban trek.

And while we step out into the Sahyadris in the monsoon, let’s be responsible.

Let’s be deserving of the beauty that nature showers us with.

Have you trekked in the Sahyadris? What did the trek do to you? Do share your stories in the Comments!

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Sandeepa and Chetan. Married. Indians. Exploring Travel as Lifestyle. Featured by National Geographic, Yahoo. We hope that through our travel stories we inspire others to make their dream into a reality.

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18 thoughts on “Andharban Trek and why you should NOT trek in the Sahyadris

  1. Jayesh Dighe

    Pretty much a NO NO trek! Will be a real danger for our lungs which are used to breathe in the “fresh” city air with full of boosters from “diesel” and “petrol” fumes!

    But as they say risk taking is required and hence would like to request the number of Mr. Tukaram! 🙂 Would be really obliged!

    BTW, really liked the sarcastic way of presenting things! Keep up the great work! Cheers!

    1. Sandeepa Chetan Post author

      Hehe, thanks Jayesh! 8805618128 – that’s Tukaram’s number. But we must warn you, the range there is extremely spotty, so have patience in getting through 🙂 This should be a good time for the Andharban trek – less water, so safe and the weather is good too.

  2. quirkywanderer

    LOVE the style here:) oh clearly we NEED this beauty and we NEED to step out and explore the hidden gems of Maharashtra! Sahyadris are beautiful and in the monsoons the green cover is simply healing!
    Love love your captivating pictures in this!

  3. Arun

    Amazing blog brother! I remembered my village in Himachal pradesh, same natural beauty and cart-ploughing is still used extensively in major portion of Himachal. This is truly amazing place, I would like to visit this place. What route will you prescribe from Chandigarh.

    1. Sandeepa Chetan Post author

      Mobile network is an issue in that part of the Tamhini ghat. Maybe he was out on a Andharban trek. While the network is available in the base Pimpri village, it is spotty on the trek. Hope you were able to get in touch with him.

  4. Divya Nambiar

    haha!!
    So green, so fresh and so beautiful. Oh yeah — that’s a lot of people. 🙂
    Lovely background music in the video, guys.
    Thank you for the monsoon sights from the Sahyadris. 🙂

  5. Khushnaz

    Absolutely gorgeous. Except the crowds, which I hate, but I guess in India, you cannot escape them. I would love to do this, and hope I can before the end of this monsoon.

    Thanks very much for sharing. You both are not only an inspiration for travellers, but also a source of credible information. Keep travelling! Hope to meet you in person someday.

    Regards,
    Khushnaz

  6. Deepak Khale

    Well written. Nice video with natural background music. And yes, we all deserve the nature. What is required is proper education right from young age to preserve the nature.